Readers of The Lost Art

Useful Links

January 4th, 2017

Please note that Newcastle City Council and the Graphic Novels Readers Group are not responsible for the content of external sites. These links are provided for information only.
 

Canny Comic Con

First, there was: Newcastle’s very own Comics Convention at the City Library, which happened on 8th December 2012 (and in December 2011). More details here: Canny Comic Con.

Second, there is: The Canny Comic Con Comic Chaos Creative Collaboration! This takes place at the City Library and is FREE: The Canny Comic Con Comic Chaos Creative Collaboration.

And now, there is… watch this space for more information about Newcastle’s very own Comics Convention and pencil 18th March 2017 in your diary! More details here: Canny Comic Con.

 

Facebook

The Readers of the Lost Art now have our own Facebook page – click here to be taken to it: Readers of the Lost Art on Facebook.

LonkBlig

This blog tracks topics that have been mentioned during our group discussions, and also much other comics- / graphic novel- related goodness: LonkBlig.

Comics websites:
The Ninth Art: Ninth Art.
Fine Art Gallery: Fine Art Gallery (a online Visual Art resource).

Bryan Talbot at Digital Story Engine: Digital Story Engine

Articles and New Books
Jean Rogers’ Livejournal review of “Alan Moore and Gothic Nightmares” (a comics-related event in March 2006 at the Tate): Jean’s Review.

 

Metronome

“Just when you thought that nobody could create something new in the comic medium, here comes Metronome – a 64-page graphic novel by Véronique Tanaka: a “silent”, erotically-charged visual poem, an experimental non-linear story using a palette of iconic ligne clair images. Symbolism, visual puns and trompe l’oeil conspire in a visual mantra that could be described as “existential manga” if it wasn’t for the fact that there is a very human and elegantly-structured tale providing a solid foundation to the cutting-edge storytelling.” You can see Metronome here: Metronome.

 

Superhero Covers:
A blogger on Livejournal attempts to draw comics objectifying male superheroes in protest over having seen one too many covers in which female superheroes are drawn as sex objects: Like Scratches in the Sand.

(Note: This isn’t especially graphic, but there are mild sexual references, as is to be expected from the subject matter. Proceed only if you are comfortable with this, and please read the disclaimer at the top of this page.)
 

Forbidden Planet
The Forbidden Planet comic shop blog: Forbidden Planet.
 

Coffee & Comics
The Edinburgh comics and graphic novels reading group’s website: Coffee & Comics.

 

Student Squad: Warriors of Harringay

Louise’s favourite webcomic, in which the semi-heroic Student Squad, Warriors of Harringay, battle the forces of the evil genius next door, the Finsbury Park Ninjas, and dastardly landlords who “might get round to” clearing the corpses out of the basement “some time next week”.

Student Squad Archive

Student Squad Current Site

 

Mapping the Necklace

A major culture and heritage project in Durham which members of the Readers of the Lost Art were involved with in 2007. See here for more details: Mapping the Necklace.

 

Murky Depths

A new hybrid comic and straight prose short story magazine. It isn’t a graphic novel, being an anthology, (although a reviewer likened its feel to a graphic novel), but graphic novel fans, writers and artists should check it out: Murky Depths.

 

Bryan Talbot – Heart of Empire

Sequel to “The Adventures of Luther Arkwright”, now available online. Here’s the link: Heart of Empire

 

Dr Mel Gibson’s Comics Website

The website of a locally-based comics scholar and consultant, with many useful resources and links. Dr Mel Gibson’s Comics Website

 

Graphic Novels of war

Link to an article in the Independent newspaper looking at how the war in Iraq is being written about by graphic novelists: Iraq: How a daring new generation of graphic novelists view the art of war.

 

“Living with a Black Dog” graphic novel

One man’s account of living with, and tackling, the “black dog” of depression. From the Guardian’s website. Living with a Black Dog.

 

Bristol Story: The Book

A tale of the history of Bristol in graphic novel form. Bristol: The Story.

 

Gad, Sir! Comics

A blog about comics from a good friend of ours: Gad, Sir! Comics

 

Capturing Kinshasa through Comics

How comics and graphic novels are being used by artists and writers in Democratic Republic of Congo to explore their country’s history and culture: Capturing Kinshasa through Comics.

 

Observer Short Story Competition 2011

The winner of the Cape / Observer Graphic Short Story Competition 2011 by Isabel Greenberg, “Love in a Very Cold Climate”: Observer Short Story Competition 2011.

 

The Essential Guide to World Comics

BBC article about a very useful guide to comics from around the world, put together by an international editing panel:

About The Essential Guide to World Comics

 

Great Graphic Novels for Teens

The American Young Adult Library Services Association’s lists of Great Graphic Novels for Teens: Graphic Novels for Teens.

 

“Watchmen”, 80’s-cartoon style

A highly funny spoof of Alan Moore’s peerless “Watchmen”, done in the style of 1980s’ children’s cartoons: “Watch Out for the Watchmen“.

 

Comics to Read Before You Die

Paul Gravett’s “1001 Comics You Must Read Before You Die” (put together with a properly international editorial group) is a thought-provoking read for people seeking to broaden their graphic novel reading tastes:

1001 Comics You Must Read Before You Die

 

Alien Ink

Online comic dealing with “teen issues” and tattoos: Alien Ink

 

Newspaper Comics

We recently focussed on newspaper comic strips. Here’s a link to the “foundational text” covering them (on Amazon.co.uk’s website): The Smithsonian Collection of Newspaper Comics.

 

Seven Soldiers Synopsis

Some years back, we read the Grant Morrison series, “Seven Soldiers of Victory”. A great series with a complex plot, here’s a handy link which summarises the story and condenses a long discussion about it:

Seven Soldiers Discussion and Plot Summary

And the original thread: Seven Soldiers Discussion 

 

Badtime Bedtime Books

An excellent website devoted to a series of children’s comics from the 1970s, created by Leo Baxendale (he of “The Bash Street Kids”, “Minnie the Minx”, “Willy the Kid” and so on): Badtime Bedtime Books.

 

The 31 scariest comics

The Comic Book resources’ website produces a list of the 31 scariest comics, just in time for Halloween: 31 Scariest Comics.

Triumph of the Nerds

Economist article about the rise of webcomics: Triumph of the nerds

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